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Apple Guide Talks: Ep. 7 – The Time has Come To Pay for your Email

In the 7th episode of the Apple Guide Talks Podcast, we take a look at Yahoo’s Subscription plans, the pros, and cons of a portless iPhone, and compare the video editing experience between the iPad Air and MacBook Pro.

Hello, welcome back to the Apple Guide Talks Podcast I’m your host Ralph Shepherd joined by my cohost Eli Piper. In this 7th episode of the podcast, we will take a look at Yahoo telling users to start paying to continue their email. So let’s take a look at how we got to this point.

Topic 1: The Time has Come To Pay for your Email

Before getting into the current situation let’s take a look at the history of Yahoo and the start of Verizon Media.

Yahoo was original launched in 1994 by Jerry Yang and David Filo. As Wikipedia states “Yahoo was one of the pioneers of the early Internet era in the 1990s”. Yahoo was apart of and survived the .com boom of the early 2000s. To continue growing they started purchasing other brands and integrating them into the Yahoo Family. It really became the one-stop-shop for news and information, web search, and email. It’s was really the Google of the early 2000s.

Just like during the .com Boom they expanded too quickly, and absorbed a lot of debt all while competition began to grow from Google who essentially whipped Yahoo of the map.

After data breaches, debt, and slowing user growth Yahoo was struggling big time. So for some reason in 2017 Verizon bought the dying company.

Before continuing with Verizon acquisition of Yahoo we have to take a look at AOL, America Online.

AOL started as a dial-up internet provider by sending out millions of disks giving users 30 minutes of free internet service. We all know what happened to dial-up. What you probably don’t know is as dial-up slowed, AOL merged with the media conglomerate Time Warner, the company behind HBO, Cartoon Network, Warner Bros, etc. That didn’t work for obvious reasons. So the two companies split and went in their own ways. But AOL still has to find a way to make money. So they morphed into a service like Yahoo provide an email, news, etc. Once again Verizon also purchased AOL.

Now under the head of the Verizon subsidiary Verizon media there are two failing companies that do basically the same thing.

Now Verizon whats to make some money from the Yahoo name, so now they have some subscription service no one will actually buy.

This is where Yahoo Mail Pro comes in. A service that costs $3.50 a month adds customer service, faster performance, and let’s you keep your emails all while removing adds. Now let’s break down what that means.

Topic 2: Portless iPhone?

Rumor has it Apple is looking to kill the last port on the iPhone, the lightning port. Is it worth it, is there something to gain? Or will we lose features by ditching the Lightning port?

Topic 3: Video Editing on iPad vs MacBook Pro

So I recently got the latest 4th gen iPad Air. I will go ahead and start off by saying this thing is a beast. This past week I took a trip to the mountains with a friend and took some video with my iPhone 12, wanting to really see the full potential of the cameras. Well, I set my camera setting on 4K, 60fps (which gives me more wiggle room while editing), HDR (Dolby Vision). My first error was the iPhone 12 only supports HDR video at 30fps, oups. So maybe it wasn’t the highest quality it could have been. None the less it was editing time. I AirDroped the video from my iPhone to iPad Air. I then put together the video in iMovie, the worst iOS video editor. However, I had no problem editing, everything ran buttery smooth. Maybe a few slowdowns during the hefty transitions, but nothing crippling. But, when I transferred the file to Final Cut Pro on my MacBook Pro I ran into an issue. It took about an hour for Final Cut to convert, open, and analyze the clips. However, once it did finally finish everything seemed to run a little smoother.

Location: Stone Mountain, North Carolina
Model: Theresa McGowan
Song: The Kite by Blonde Maze

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